Keeping Track of Multiples

One of the best pieces of advice I got when we were preparing for our twins was to keep track of their feedings and diaper changes.  It sounded silly at the time but after I had the girls there were sleep-deprived days when I did not know which was up and could easily have fed the same baby over and over.

With newborn twins you are so tired and overworked that it is easy to get confused.  Besides feeding the same baby twice, you could also miss one baby being constipated or having other problems.  Also with multiples you probably have even more people helping out than you would with one baby.  Your spouse, parents, friends, other family, may all be more involved.  Charting feedings and changes can make it easy to pass off the kiddos.

We started with charts they use at the hospital.  The nurses gave us extras to take home until we could make our own.  We saw some very complex ones online to keep track of every minute of the day, but, for our family, we found those unnecessary and were able to make up a simple one on the computer.

We kept track of their feedings (time, amount, order fed) and their changings (urine or stool).  I also wanted to keep track of tummy time because it is easy to overlook with two tiny babies and then included space to describe the day or special notes.

To help you get started, here’s our chart:  Twins Chart  If it was a feeding we filled in the amount portion, if it was a diaper change we checked if it was urine or stool.

Want to know the very best advice I got?  Whenever one wakes up, wake up the other.  And whenever one eats, feed the other.  Everyone says don’t wake a sleeping baby, but not with twins.  It gets them on the same schedule and makes your life easier.
Want more tips and advice for twins?  Check out Twins! Expert Advice from two practicing physicians on pregnancy, birth and the first year of life.

After we found out we were having twins, our doctor had to miss our appointment to deliver twins.  Her grumpy replacement, would not answer any questions for us.  Instead she told us to get a book on twins.  So we bought our twins book.  And then we asked our doctor a bunch of questions.  🙂

 

Christmas Colors Felt Board Story

I came up with this felt board activity based on the classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin, Jr.  It follows the same rhythm but uses colors and images from the holiday season.

Skills: Color recognition, language development
Prep: Medium (drawing/decorating the pieces did take some time, but if you use solid pieces of felt it goes much quicker)

 

White Snowman, White Snowman, what do you see?
I see a green tree looking at me.

Green Tree, Green Tree, what do you see?
I see a red hat looking at me.

Red Hat, Red Hat, what do you see?
I see a blue present looking at me.

Blue Present, Blue Present, what do you see?
I see a yellow star looking at me.

Yellow Star, Yellow Star, what do you see?
I see a purple stocking looking at me.

Purple Stocking, Purple Stocking, what do you see?
I see a brown reindeer looking at me.

Brown Reindeer, Brown Reindeer, what do you see?
I see an orange light looking at me.

Orange Light, Orange Light, what do you see?
I see _(Child’s Name)_ looking at me.

_(Child’s Name)_, _(Child’s Name)_, what do you see?
I see a white snowman, a green tree, a red hat, a blue present, a yellow star, a purple stocking, a brown reindeer, and an orange light looking at me.

Like most of our felt board activities, the first time we did this, I recited the poem and placed the pieces on the board.  When we went through it a second time, I tried to get the girls to say it with me as we pulled out pieces and put them on the board.

Ed drew the images for me, which I have included below.  You can cut silhouettes from colored felt or draw/trace images on  pellon to color in with oil pastel crayons.

Tree and Reindeer Images
Snowman and Stocking Images
Present and Hat Images
Star and Light Images

 

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