Will it Freeze? Experiment

As part of our Frozen-themed unit we did an experiment to see how different liquids freeze differently.  Our question was “Do all liquids freeze the same?”  States of matter are one of the girls’ favorite science topics lately so this experiment was right up their ally.  I loved that it was such a quick and easy experiment that they found interesting.

First we gathered a bunch of different liquids…

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Need ideas?  Here’s what all we used:

  • Water
  • Orange Juice
  • Olive oil
  • Sprite
  • Tomato Juice
  • Corn syrup
  • Shampoo
  • Ketchup
  • Chocolate syrup
  • Windex
  • Vinegar
  • Dish soap
  • Milk
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Wine
  • Apple Juice

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I made these worksheets for them to use as we went through the experiment.  I thought it was interesting that the girls each had a different hypothesis–one saying they will all freeze the same and the other saying that they will freeze at different times.  The ice cube tray diagram allowed us to keep track of which liquids were in which spot.

Freezing experiment

We then placed our ice cube tray into the freezer.  Then at our set intervals we would take out the tray and record our observations.  I just had them make an F in each square that was frozen when we checked.  After doing the experiment I realized it would be better if we had checked after 10 minutes, 1 hour, and then 4 hours so I changed the worksheets to reflect that.

Freezing experiment2
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Click here to download Will it Freeze? worksheets

The girls were able to come to the conclusion that different liquids freeze at different rates.  We were also able to introduce the idea of viscosity since they were able to see how it affects the rate of freezing as those with a high viscosity froze more rapidly than those with a low viscosity.

 

Pumpkins Math and Science

So Halloween may have passed but I still wanted to share our pumpkin activities, especially since they can still work for Thanksgiving.  And to avoid one monster long post about pumpkins so I divided it up so here are our math and science activities we’ve been doing lately.

Pumpkin Craft–Life Cycle and Parts All Rolled Into One

I combined about five different pumpkin crafts that I liked into one super sciency pumpkin.  First we used three paper plates to create the pumpkin body–one of the base, one for the back pocket, and one of the frame.

Pumpkin Science Craft

We painted the pumpkins with pumpkin-scented paint–just adding pumpkin spice to our orange paint.  We also used a cork for our stem.

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On the framed side, we showed the different parts of the pumpkin.  We used real seeds and then pipe cleaners (or you could use orange yarn) for the fibers inside.  While creating it, the girls also cut and pasted the labels for the different parts.

Download labels for parts of the pumpkin.docx

Parts of pumpkin craft

We then added our life cycle vine to the pumpkin.  We used the circle labels for the different stages from printables.atoz

Pumpkin Life Cycle Craft

After attaching them to the yarn, we tied it to our pumpkin stem.  They can also get tucked into the pocket on the back side.

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Pumpkin Worksheets

Before making our pumpkins, we completed the following worksheets to help learn about the pumpkin life cycle and the different parts of a pumpkin.

Pumpkin life cycle worksheet from education.com

Pumpkin life cycle worksheet from education.com Click the picture for the worksheet

Worksheet on pumpkin parts from ateachingmommy.com

Worksheet on pumpkin parts from ateachingmommy.com Click the picture to link to the worksheet

Pumpkin Investigation

There are TONS of different pumpkin investigation worksheets out there where kids answer questions about their pumpkin.  This one, from Fun For First, was my personal favorite and the one we chose to use.  It was the most thorough and touched on the topics I wanted the girls to explore.

Pumpkin Investigation

 

Number Lines

pumpkin number line

In math our current chapter is on number order (we use the Singpore Math Kindergarten Curriculum) so I had us make these adorable pumpkin number lines.  While you can use a pumpkin template and then stickers or handwritten numbers, I just used my cricut to cut the pumpkins and numbers.  Then the girls glued them all together.  Finally they strung them on ribbon, which was great practice since we recently started learning to stitch.

And yes, I have realized that my little one did the seven backwards. :)

And yes, I have realized that my little one did the seven backwards. 🙂

 

Number Cards and Playdough

To review our number shapes (and hopefully help with our handwriting) we used these fall-themed number cards from Life Over C’s.

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And then for the playdough we used clay made from pumpkin (recipe courtesy of Fun at Home with Kids).  All you need is canned pumpkin, corn starch, and pumpkin spice.  Mix it together until it is the consistency and smell you would like.  In addition to using this with our number cards, it also made a great sensory activity for the girls to play with while I did some one on one work with each.

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Weather Mapping

Lately we’ve been talking about how different places have different weather (the girls have been very disappointed it’s not snowing here) so I decided to have us map out the weather.

I wanted to keep the map simple, just the general states, so I used this one from nationalatlas.gov (a great site).

us_map_states

Then I used our weather cards to make these stickers.  We have some sticker paper for the printer but we’ve also just used full size labels in the past.

weather stickers

We put out a call on Facebook asking our friends to share photos of what it looked like outside.  With each picture, we added a sticker to our map.  After just a few stickers the girls started noticing patterns with the weather and understanding how the weather was different everywhere.  This is still a work in progress, but thank you so much to all our friends who helped us!

weather map

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